Author Archives: pmalde

About pmalde

Professor, Dept. of Art and Art History

Art and Science

Compilation of three dimensional topologies, projections and photographs from research on skin. Jo Berry, Author provided (no reuse)
Compilation of three dimensional topologies, projections and photographs from research on skin. Jo Berry, Author provided (no reuse)

“Art can provide unpredictable viewpoints from which to inspect or challenge scientific ideas and assumptions” — Ken Arnold, Wellcome Trust

Writing in The Conversation, Jo Berry strives to bring together seemingly disparate approaches. It’s an inspiring read for those of us who learn in liberal arts programs.

Over a decade of merging science and art, I’ve discovered three major advantages to such collaborations. 

1. The variety of collaborations increased my appreciation for technical advances in scientific visualisation.

2. They inspire both scientists and artists to think creatively.

3. They contribute to making science more accessible to the general public.

Jo Berry

Books on Reserve

Books on Reserve

What They Saw: Historical Photobooks by Women, 1843–1999

photobook history, explores photobooks created by women from photography’s beginnings to the dawn of the 21st century.

Alive And Destroyed: A Meditation On The Holocaust In Time

Alive and Destroyed contemplates the long aftermath of the twentieth century’s most notorious crime, drawing on contemporary scholarship, with a focus on dispersed and remote locations in the Holocaust’s vast geography.

Freedom Tastes of Reality

Life no longer happens around our body. Our bodies are being excluded; working remotely means that most jobs do not require the presence of the body. Thus, productivity and presence have been dissociated and, in the same way, we now have friendships without presence, sexuality without presence, education without presence… Freedom Tastes of Reality invites us to reflect on this increasingly absent body.

Departure Lounge

Eskenazi uses the metaphor of a Departure Lounge to explore some of the ways we depart from places and even from ourselves, until the final departure from life. The book is dedicated to the author’s father.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/departure-lounge

Wonderland: A Fairy Tale of the Soviet Monolith

The story of Communism is the story of the twentieth century. For many the Soviet Union existed, like their childhood, as a fairy tale where many of the realities of life were hidden from plain view. When the Berlin Wall finally fell, so too did the illusion of that utopia. Wonderland is a photographic exploration that portrays both the reality beneath the veneer of a utopian USSR and the affirmation of hope that should never be abandoned. And like all fairy tales try to teach us: the hard lessons of self-reliance. 

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/wonderland

Black Garden 

Though the trilogy was constructed step by step, added on book by book, there is a cohesive structure by using consecutive chapters 1-9, and consecutive plate numbers 1-314, throughout the three books. The three books span the time frame of almost 30 years, basically the time frame of Eskenazi’s photographic journeys, from when he made his first foray into the world landing in Moscow in 1991-2001, until living in Istanbul in 2010-2018. By the end of the trilogy one will see some similar images from the same contact sheets from previous books giving the impression that only a moment has passed during the last 30 years represented in these three volumes. Both Wonderland and Departure Lounge were sized to exactly fit into the parameters of Black Garden. Eskenazi says he was influenced by the religious triptychs he encountered while guarding European paintings at the museum.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/black-garden

Cargo

“Migration is a leap into the void. It is an experience that isn’t particularly misunderstood, but rather unrecognized, like languages we’ve vaguely heard at some point in our lives, but to which we aren’t able to attach a body. Or temperatures and distances that, measured in unaccustomed units, can be assimilated, yet only half-rhymed. It is an experience hidden in the invisible weight of opposites – the collision of the old and the new world, the social and the personal, empathy and intellection, the immemorial and factual remembrance of things.

As if packed and stored within a piece of luggage, these images, or fragments of living, represent layers of memory – the memorial, the immemorial, and the everyday. This cargo, seemingly disordered and lacking consistent narrative, is nothing more than a repository of an intimate, yet collective existence.” – Posner

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/carg

Hafiz

The title Hafiz refers to one who has memorized all 604 pages of the Holy Quran. Historically the task of memorization began during the time of Muhammad. The individual process can take up to four years and is usually done by girls ranging in age from eight to nineteen. Turkey has thousands of Quran schools.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/hafiz

Past Perfect Continuous

In 2006, Igor Posner returned to St. Petersburg, the city where he was born, for the first time in 14 years. Confronted by the shifting resonance of place and memory, the resulting  pictures are fundamentally impressionistic, grasped through distances of  time.

This is a city half-seen and  half-recollected, one version overlaid imperfectly on the other, mapping  where the past and the present intersect – a fictional city, then, one  that is, in a sense, conjured up by the desire to find some lost incarnation of what was once familiar – a desire that will never, ultimately, be realized. Posner is trying to get the measure of what it  means to deal with the past in photographic terms.

There is a collision of distinct  experiences and times. His present encounter with the city is inevitably  shaped by what he knew of it – the narrative is one of the return and  expectation; the dark uncertainty of these images, their haunting sense  of dislocation, is a testament to that, these places speak not only of  what they are now, but also of what they might have been.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/past-perfect-continuous

Lakeside 

tackles the historical contradictions of white supremacy as they are manifested in present day suburban Virginia.

“Lakeside, Virginia is a psychic landscape, a representation of countless spaces initially built to feign the ‘American Exceptionalism’ writ to redact America’s contentious reality,” Rocheleau says. “Lakeside is also a place with 11,000 people doing the best they can—ugly and beautiful things alike—while drowning in the reality that dreaming gets far less than its promise.”

You are Masters of the Fish and Birds and All the Animals 

“For the past three years, I have been making work about white American masculinity. I am scarred but exceptionally privileged by it, and thus responsible to address it.

White American masculinity is a construct. It is the subtext in detergent and power tool ads, crystallized at football games and in sermons, described in the design of little boy’s clothing. It undergirds our politics and religiosity, and permeates our homes. And it’s scary.”  – Shane Rocheleau

Gloire Immortelle

In 1968, the West African photographer Rachidi Bissiriou set up his photographic studio, Studio Plaisir, in his hometown of Kétou in Benin, which he operated until its closure in 2004. The timing of this was conspicuous – Bissiriou was only 18 and Benin had only declared its independence from French rule eight years earlier, in 1960. Armed with a Yashica twin-lens camera, Bissiriou documented these heady times, spending the next three decades shooting black and white photographs of the locals in a standard 6x6cm format. 

Family Photographs

Joan Albert, 1943-2012, created a remarkable body of work over a short period of time from the 1970s through the early 1990s in Massachusetts.

Her intimate photographs of her growing sons are filled with emotion, humour, and the obsessions of teenage and pre-teenage boys of at the tail end of the last century. Alberts 4 x 5” view camera portraits of her parents, friends and neighbours with their children are similarly poignant and richly detailed, showing the complexity and intensity of parent-child relation- ships.

Siri Kaur – Class Visit Sept. 1 2022

Siri Kaur
From series “Crow’s Field”

From Siri Kaur’s website about Crow’s Field:

Siri Kaur (b. Boston, MA,1976) is an artist and photographer who examines identities that occupy dualities, diversity, and contradiction, with a rigorous eye for the photographic quality of magic. She received her MFA from The California Institute of the Arts, and an MA and a BA from Smith College. Kaur’s work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at Blythe Projects, Cohen Gallery, and Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles; at 99¢ Plus, New York; at the Vermont Center for Photography, and at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Group shows include those at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the San Antonio Museum of Art, the Aperture Foundation, the Portland Museum of Art, the Camera Club of New York, the Torrance Museum of Art, and the Museum of Photographic Arts, among others.

Kaur’s work has been reviewed in ARTFORUM, The Los Angeles Times, The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. She was a Professor of Fine Arts at Otis College of Art and Design from 2007-2018. In 2014 Leroy Press published Kaur’s first monograph, This Kind of Face,that documented the world of celebrity impersonators. She lives and works in Los Angeles.

Crow’s Field was the name Kaur and her childhood friends gave an unclaimed strip of farmland where she grew up in rural New England. During games this nameless acreage between the forest and the road became a magical no-man‘s-land, transforming into a metaphorical space where the imaginary and the real collide.

Invaded throughout by everyday natural elements that are almost too strange to believe, Kaur creates an otherworldy stream-of-consciousness meditation on memory in photographs- a freshly caught octopus becomes a pagan still life; a girl and her dog morph into a chimera at rest; a sunflower transforms into a baroque abstraction. Upon closer examination, a touch of menace often underlies the most familiar and genteel exteriors. Kaur seizes on the corroding sense of uneasiness that gnaws at her most cherished attachments. It’s not that she can’t go home again; it’s that home was never exactly what she thought it was.

Siri Kaur will be remote-visiting ART 363 on September 01, 2022.

Ken Kitano: Our Face

Ken Kitano
30 marchers at “World Peace Now”, the demonstration of 50,000 people protesting the US-UK attacks against Iraq, March 8, 2003, from Hibiya Park to streets of Ginza, Tokyo

See more here

From the Blindspot exhibition press release:

At first glance images in our face can be deceiving. Where it appears to be an ambiguous portrait of a single person, it is in fact an accumulation and stratification of several dozen individuals. The single figure we see does not exist as an actual person, nor can it be classed as a true portrait. Instead it is far closer to the demographic whole, not only a representation of the subject but also a creation of a new signifier, questioning people’s very existence.

Kitano has been working on our face since 1999, when he started taking photos of various social groups, divided into 6 categories: on the road, religion, children, war, race and occupation. The images ranged from Chinese laborer, to Muslim women, to world peace protesters. The project started in his motherland but

continued on to other parts of the world, making it his life’s work.

Kitano’s techniques are of the old school. His work is painstakingly produced and time consuming, using darkroom layering process which combines dozens of negatives, images are projected on top of one another with precise exposures to create an icon of a particular community. Kitano sees darkroom skills as a handcraft, artistry of a bygone age. Each of the life size print is unique and printed in Three Shadows Photography Art Centre (Beijing), one of the very few facilities in the world where this work can be produced on such a scale.

On Reserve for Fall 2022

The following books have been placed on 3-hour Reserve for Pradip Malde’s classes during this Fall 2022 semester:

Books on Reserve

What They Saw: Historical Photobooks by Women, 1843–1999

photobook history, explores photobooks created by women from photography’s beginnings to the dawn of the 21st century.

Alive And Destroyed: A Meditation On The Holocaust In Time

Alive and Destroyed contemplates the long aftermath of the twentieth century’s most notorious crime, drawing on contemporary scholarship, with a focus on dispersed and remote locations in the Holocaust’s vast geography.

Freedom Tastes of Reality

Life no longer happens around our body. Our bodies are being excluded; working remotely means that most jobs do not require the presence of the body. Thus, productivity and presence have been dissociated and, in the same way, we now have friendships without presence, sexuality without presence, education without presence… Freedom Tastes of Reality invites us to reflect on this increasingly absent body.

Departure Lounge

Eskenazi uses the metaphor of a Departure Lounge to explore some of the ways we depart from places and even from ourselves, until the final departure from life. The book is dedicated to the author’s father.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/departure-lounge

Wonderland: A Fairy Tale of the Soviet Monolith

The story of Communism is the story of the twentieth century. For many the Soviet Union existed, like their childhood, as a fairy tale where many of the realities of life were hidden from plain view. When the Berlin Wall finally fell, so too did the illusion of that utopia. Wonderland is a photographic exploration that portrays both the reality beneath the veneer of a utopian USSR and the affirmation of hope that should never be abandoned. And like all fairy tales try to teach us: the hard lessons of self-reliance. 

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/wonderland

Black Garden 

Though the trilogy was constructed step by step, added on book by book, there is a cohesive structure by using consecutive chapters 1-9, and consecutive plate numbers 1-314, throughout the three books. The three books span the time frame of almost 30 years, basically the time frame of Eskenazi’s photographic journeys, from when he made his first foray into the world landing in Moscow in 1991-2001, until living in Istanbul in 2010-2018. By the end of the trilogy one will see some similar images from the same contact sheets from previous books giving the impression that only a moment has passed during the last 30 years represented in these three volumes. Both Wonderland and Departure Lounge were sized to exactly fit into the parameters of Black Garden. Eskenazi says he was influenced by the religious triptychs he encountered while guarding European paintings at the museum.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/black-garden

Cargo

“Migration is a leap into the void. It is an experience that isn’t particularly misunderstood, but rather unrecognized, like languages we’ve vaguely heard at some point in our lives, but to which we aren’t able to attach a body. Or temperatures and distances that, measured in unaccustomed units, can be assimilated, yet only half-rhymed. It is an experience hidden in the invisible weight of opposites – the collision of the old and the new world, the social and the personal, empathy and intellection, the immemorial and factual remembrance of things.

As if packed and stored within a piece of luggage, these images, or fragments of living, represent layers of memory – the memorial, the immemorial, and the everyday. This cargo, seemingly disordered and lacking consistent narrative, is nothing more than a repository of an intimate, yet collective existence.” – Posner

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/carg

Hafiz

The title Hafiz refers to one who has memorized all 604 pages of the Holy Quran. Historically the task of memorization began during the time of Muhammad. The individual process can take up to four years and is usually done by girls ranging in age from eight to nineteen. Turkey has thousands of Quran schools.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/hafiz

Past Perfect Continuous

In 2006, Igor Posner returned to St. Petersburg, the city where he was born, for the first time in 14 years. Confronted by the shifting resonance of place and memory, the resulting  pictures are fundamentally impressionistic, grasped through distances of  time.

This is a city half-seen and  half-recollected, one version overlaid imperfectly on the other, mapping  where the past and the present intersect – a fictional city, then, one  that is, in a sense, conjured up by the desire to find some lost incarnation of what was once familiar – a desire that will never, ultimately, be realized. Posner is trying to get the measure of what it  means to deal with the past in photographic terms.

There is a collision of distinct  experiences and times. His present encounter with the city is inevitably  shaped by what he knew of it – the narrative is one of the return and  expectation; the dark uncertainty of these images, their haunting sense  of dislocation, is a testament to that, these places speak not only of  what they are now, but also of what they might have been.

https://www.redhookeditions.com/books-1/past-perfect-continuous

Lakeside 

tackles the historical contradictions of white supremacy as they are manifested in present day suburban Virginia.

“Lakeside, Virginia is a psychic landscape, a representation of countless spaces initially built to feign the ‘American Exceptionalism’ writ to redact America’s contentious reality,” Rocheleau says. “Lakeside is also a place with 11,000 people doing the best they can—ugly and beautiful things alike—while drowning in the reality that dreaming gets far less than its promise.”

You are Masters of the Fish and Birds and All the Animals 

“For the past three years, I have been making work about white American masculinity. I am scarred but exceptionally privileged by it, and thus responsible to address it.

White American masculinity is a construct. It is the subtext in detergent and power tool ads, crystallized at football games and in sermons, described in the design of little boy’s clothing. It undergirds our politics and religiosity, and permeates our homes. And it’s scary.”  – Shane Rocheleau

Gloire Immortelle

In 1968, the West African photographer Rachidi Bissiriou set up his photographic studio, Studio Plaisir, in his hometown of Kétou in Benin, which he operated until its closure in 2004. The timing of this was conspicuous – Bissiriou was only 18 and Benin had only declared its independence from French rule eight years earlier, in 1960. Armed with a Yashica twin-lens camera, Bissiriou documented these heady times, spending the next three decades shooting black and white photographs of the locals in a standard 6x6cm format. 

Family Photographs

Joan Albert, 1943-2012, created a remarkable body of work over a short period of time from the 1970s through the early 1990s in Massachusetts.

Her intimate photographs of her growing sons are filled with emotion, humour, and the obsessions of teenage and pre-teenage boys of at the tail end of the last century. Alberts 4 x 5” view camera portraits of her parents, friends and neighbours with their children are similarly poignant and richly detailed, showing the complexity and intensity of parent-child relation- ships.

Aug 14 – First Advising Meetings

Friday, August 14, 2020:

9:00am to 9:45am
I invite all of my FR advisees to join me via Zoom* for a remote coffee and introduction. *Please check your email and calendar for the link.

10:00am to 10:45am or
11:00am to 11:45am
Two groups of five FR will meet with me via Zoom*, at which time we will go over the following. Please give some thought to the italicized portions ahead of our meeting.

Course schedules. These have been established based on your preferences and input. Each person is scheduled to take 16 hours as semester begins. Your class schedule has been crafted by an almost prescient group of faculty, and carefully fitted into a larger and quite complex schedule. The chances of you wanting to, and even being able to, change classes from this point are slim. And that should give you comfort! It is one thing less to fret about as you cross into a new horizon. There is a process for swapping classes, but be aware that there are very few open seats.
Do you have any concerns about your schedule selections?
You may add 0 / 1 / 2-hour courses, such as athletics/PE, starting Aug. 17, for which you will need an advising PIN. I will distribute these after our meeting on Friday.


General Education courses deepen and broaden the way we think and form skills and habits. They often introduce us to new ways of being.
Please look over the Gen. Ed. objectives and the recently added G7 learning objective. Do you have any questions about these?

Liberal Arts eduction is a bit like a web of bungie cords, which will connect you to the world for the rest of your life. Let’s talk about what this means to you.

My commitments to you as an advisor

I will

  • Guide you through the academic process
  • Connect you to resources
  • Help you understand College policies and procedures
  • Be a sounding board / encourager

I expect from you

  • Commitment to broadening and deepening your passion for life, through our academic work and community
  • Communicating regularly with me, even if it is just to say all is well
  • Presence (come to meetings, be engaged, ask to meet)
  • Claim responsibility for own education
  • Slow Urgency … take it easy, but take it (attributed to Woody Guthrie among many others)

Looking ahead:

Between August 21 and 25, I will arrange short, individual meetings with you to get a sense of how your first week of classes has been, and to address any concerns that may point to schedule adjustments.

Check out the Advising resource page… it is a work in progress, but may already be useful.

COVID-19: Online Portfolios and Adobe Programs

 

Two important resources have been put in place as a response to COVID-19.

Art Majors and some other Sewanee students will be displaying their ongoing work and final portfolios via the online image content management system, Picter

In response to the closure of classroom spaces, Sewanee students and faculty may now install Adobe programs on their own computer.

Thanks to Picter and Adobe for generously facilitating this!